Job description

Lodging managers oversee all activities at a hotel, motel or any other establishment that offers accommodation. They ensure that guests have a positive, comfortable stay in a clean, safe and service-oriented environment. Lodging managers can have multiple responsibilities, including room inspections, hiring staff, budgeting and resolving guest issues. Larger hotels may split duties between several managers.

Duties

    • Set room rates, establish budgets and monitor profits and losses
    • Handle guest questions and concerns and offer compensation when necessary
    • Interview and hire staff
    • Train workers and monitor their performance
    • Assign duties and set work schedules for employees
    • Inspect rooms, common areas and hotel grounds for cleanliness and appearance
    • Ensure guests and staff have functioning fixtures, equipment and appliances
    • Show and rent accommodations to both business and holidaying customers
    • Coordinate with staff and hotel chain leadership on marketing and promotions
    • Assure building and its operation meet ownership's set standards and legal codes and regulations
    • Collect payments and keep records of all transactions
    • Negotiate with vendors for supplies and services such as laundry and lawn maintenance
    • Communicate with patrons to help organise their special events, conventions and other functions
    • Oversee hotel restaurant and room service
    • Coordinate with other managers and staff to keep all operations running smoothly

Skills, qualities and knowledge

Leadership
Communication
Problem-solving
Active listening
Facilities management software
Financial software
Accounting
Social perceptiveness
Decision-making
Negotiation
Time management
Stress tolerance
Initiative

Working hours and environment

Average working hours

50hweek

Typical schedule

Full Time

Nights, weekends, holidays occasionally

Most lodging managers work full time, on site at the hotel. Some work during business hours but are on call 24/7 in case of emergencies. Expanded or alternate schedules that include evening and weekend hours are also possible.

Responsibilities for lodging managers are extensive and can include overseeing property maintenance, food service, guest satisfaction and hotel profitability. Problems must be resolved quickly, and constant multitasking can be stressful.

Salary

Bottom 10%

$31k

Median

$53k

Top 10%

$100k

Annual salary estimates are based on percentile wage data collected through the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey of US workers.

Qualifications and training

Education level

Undergraduate

DVM / VMD degree

Study time

4years

A bachelor's degree in hospitality or hotel management is a requirement for lodging manager positions at full-service hotels and hotel chains. The coursework provides essential knowledge in subjects like marketing and sales, housekeeping, and hotel maintenance.

Smaller chains and more modest motels are likely to consider manager candidates with an associate's degree in hospitality. Certification from the American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute (AHLEI) takes two years to complete and can also help to boost your CV. Those with management experience in other fields may bypass some of the education requirements.

Job outlook

Projected growth
The projected growth rate of employment in the US from 2016 to 2026, based on data collected through the BLS Employment Projections (EP) programme. The national average growth rate for all professions is 7%.

4%

No of new jobs
The number of jobs projected to become available in the US between 2016 and 2026, based on data collected through the BLS Employment Projections (EP) programme.

1.9k

Automation risk
The probability of computerisation, based on data published in ‘The Future of Employment’, a 2013 working paper by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne.

0.4%

Career progression

Many lodging managers start out as assistant managers or in another role at the hotel. You can also work your way up from small independent establishments to larger and more well-known chains.

Gaining work experience in increasingly larger hotels can lead to a regional manager position. Advanced managerial positions sometimes require relocation due to limited openings.

With lodging manager education and experience, you might also consider investing in a hotel franchise. This gives you the opportunity for managing the property as well as benefitting directly from profits.