Job description

Food preparation workers perform routine tasks to assist cooks, chefs or food service managers in commercial kitchens. They weigh and measure ingredients, wash and chop vegetables and fruits, slice meat, and prepare condiments and dressings. Food preparation workers also clean, sanitise and arrange work areas, equipment, dishes and utensils. They may also be responsible for food storage, packing meals for delivery and restocking buffet tables.

Duties

    • Wash, peel and cut vegetables and fruits for cooking or serving
    • Prepare meat for cooking, including defrosting, slicing or grinding
    • Defrost, clean and cut poultry and seafood for the day's menu as instructed
    • Weigh or measure ingredients for recipes
    • Make dressings, sauces and condiments
    • Mix ingredients for salads and other cold dishes
    • Arrange meals on warmers or trays for waitstaff, or in takeout containers for customer orders
    • Prepare desserts
    • Place ingredients or meals in storage containers and proper storage areas to prevent spoilage
    • Monitor inventory and record temperature of food and food storage areas as directed
    • Clean and sanitise work areas, kitchen equipment, dishes, utensils, pots and pans
    • Assist chefs with any assigned tasks, including retrieving pots and stirring soups and sauces
    • Use kitchen appliances and equipment, including automated slicers and dishwashers
    • Prepare coffee, tea, soft drinks and other beverages
    • Keep salad bars and buffet tables clean and stocked

Skills, qualities and knowledge

Active listening
Coordination
Dexterity
Physical strength
Physical stamina
Service orientation
Time management
Attention to detail
Teamwork
Dependability
Adaptability
Initiative
Stress tolerance
Integrity

Working hours and environment

Average working hours

20hweek

Typical schedule

Shift Work

Nights, weekends and holidays

Food preparation workers typically find jobs in restaurants and other dining establishments such as hotels, bars and banquet halls. They may also work in delis, bakeries and other food and beverage stores. Some work in school, government or healthcare cafeterias.

Most food preparation workers take part-time shift work. Hours may include early mornings, nights, weekends and holidays. Those working in schools or seasonal resorts may have more regular schedules, but only for part of a calendar year.

Food preparation requires long hours of standing and may include heavy lifting and repetitive tasks. Commercial kitchens require high standards in a fast-paced environment, which can be very stressful. There are also potential safety hazards, including cuts, burns and falls. Most injuries aren't serious, and you can mitigate the danger by wearing gloves, aprons and non-slip shoes.

Salary

Bottom 10%

$18k

Median

$24k

Top 10%

$34k

Annual salary estimates are based on percentile wage data collected through the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey of US workers.

Qualifications and training

Education level

N/A

DVM / VMD degree

Study time

3months

There are no formal education requirements for food preparation workers. You will typically receive on-the-job training, either from the chef in charge or an experienced worker. Training may include lessons on safe handling, prep and storage of food as well as workplace safety and sanitation regulations.

Job outlook

Projected growth
The projected growth rate of employment in the US from 2018 to 2028, based on data collected through the BLS Employment Projections (EP) programme. The national average growth rate for all professions is 5%.

8%

No of new jobs
The number of jobs projected to become available in the US between 2018 and 2028, based on data collected through the BLS Employment Projections (EP) programme.

69.1k

Automation risk
The probability of computerisation, based on data published in ‘The Future of Employment’, a 2013 working paper by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne.

87%

Career progression

On-the-job training and experience can lead to more advanced positions in food service, like line cook or assistant cook. You may consider using your skills in other related jobs, such as baker, butcher or bartender. With a high school diploma, you can work your way up to a more lucrative role as head cook or chef.